C-Section and Contentment

Yesterday the preliminary bill came for the upcoming c-section. While I’m SUPER GRATEFUL I have a heads up on the cost, I’m not so grateful at how much it is going to cost to bring this crazy man-child into the world.

This is our 4th (and final…) child. And my 4th c-section. Our first child cost $250 to bring into this world. The c-section cost for our second and third children was $500 each. This one? $4,912.20! Wowza. But guess how much the actual c-section costs? $65,218.50. Holy.cow. I’m grateful for insurance…even if it’s gonna cost us almost $5,000, that’s better than $65,000!

I also have a confession to make that has been weighing heavy on me. Especially since the reason for starting this blog was to hold ourselves accountable for our spending habits. We have paid all of our monthly bills, have food in our cupboards and gas in our cars…and have $75 left until the end of the month. This is uncomfortable for me. I don’t like living paycheck to paycheck. And I can’t help but think “what decisions did we make this month that have put us in this position?” This money thing is a monster, and there’s so much guilt wrapped up in it for me.

So, we’ll be going on a payment plan for the c-section. That’s really all we can do at this point. Our debt snowball starts July 1, and the surgery cost will be rolled into that.

But I’d like to also take a step back here and recognize: feeling sorry for myself or discouraged is not going to get me anywhere! So, I did some research (one of my favorite things to do. True story: when I was in high school I was meeting with my high school counselor about college and goals etc and I said I wanted to be a paralegal because I love doing the research and she said to me “no, you can do better than that.” You know what? I think I am! Alright, back to the real reason for this post) and I found this awesome post by Carly at MommyOnPurpose.com. She wrote something that really resonated with me: Practice Contentment. She says:

We live in this culture of “never-enough” and we are constantly being bombarded by the message that we won’t ever be happy until we have more.

This is one of the most life-destroying lies I’ve ever heard. The truth is that we will never be happy until we can be happy with what we have.

My children are spoiled rotten. And for the past few months, I have recognized in them how much they don’t appreciate the awesome things they have and how they always want more, more, more! They have SO MUCH STUFF that they don’t understand the concept of contentment. I’m trying to figure out how to teach this to them. Modeling the behavior is definitely one way, as this seems to be an area that is more “caught than taught,” which means Ian and I both have to really make a switch in our daily lives. In fact, I think I’ll do some research about this and get back to you!

Would love to hear how you deal with the guilt of debt…I’m sure there’s many things we can learn from you!

Have a fantastic day!

 

6 Replies to “C-Section and Contentment”

      1. For sure! Let me know how it goes if you try it. I’ve never done it (no kids) but I love the idea of introducing minimalism and quality over quantity at a younger age.

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  1. I used to do toy rotation. Every six months I’d hide some of their toys…. the. Rotate others next time, and they loved it. They were so excited to play with their “new” toys. This would especially work well with video games and anything really

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  2. HI!! I just wanted to say that I loved this post and I’m so glad to hear that you are practicing contentment! It’s a message we need to spread around 🙂

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